Here I give two measurement forms for anyone who may wish to use them recreating historical menswear. I have edited and cleaned up both forms to make them beter for printing. The first is from my personal collection and was published in Tailor and Cutter for use with the CPG System (Cutters Practical Guide) Though…

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Recently I was reading through the situation advertisements in the May 4, 1905 issue of Tailor & Cutter and thought I would share them here for those who may take an interest. There is a lot to be learned and observed in how those within the tailoring trade sought employment or looked for work-hands to…

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Here I present from a digital copy of “The Ladies Tailor, April 1, 1894” that I scanned from the original in my collection. The Ladies Tailor was a weekly or monthly publication produced by The John Williamson Co Ltd and edited by WDF Vincent, a prolific and well respected tailoring author of his time.  …

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Shorts or “short trousers” may not be the first garment that comes to mind at the mention of Victorian or Edwardian clothing, but contrary to what some may believe they were in common use by men in the last decade of the 19th century for various sports such as football, rugby and rowing. Before that…

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They certainly do. And they bit in the past, just as much as they bite now. Luckily, I live in Vancouver where you’ll only get the occasional mosquito and not much more. In contrast to the Caribou region of British Columbia, where you may end up with your own personal cloud of insects prepared to…

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Top hat made by Christys London and sold by Clubb & Stewart, Klondike Outfitters of Vancouver, BC. Dates to the late 1890s. Clubb & Stewart top hat. Clubb & Stewart top hat. Exterior of Clubb and Stewart Klondike Outfitters Exterior of Clubb and Stewart Klondike Outfitters Interior of Clubb and Stewart Klondike Outfitters Dec. 31, 1897 ad…

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Striped coachman’s waistcoat worn in Montreal. This waistcoat was purchased by Sir Edward Clouston from Hill Brothers (a tailor specializing in uniforms) for one of his servants “Coachman Smith” in 1909. The striped wool and cut of this waistcoat are typical of livery (servants uniforms) of 19th and 20th centuries. Striped wool coachman’s waistcoat. Handsewn…

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In my reproduction of nineteenth-century clothing for daily wear and reenactment, I set out to replicate a snowshoe costume as a wearable example of authentic Canadian fashion in the Victorian period. These were often worn by members of snowshoeing clubs and consisted of a blanket coat tied with a long sash, with a wool toque,…

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I was recently looking though the online William Notman collection of photos. I came across two photos showing unusual waistcoats. Both photos are from Montreal, Canada in 1868-69. I recognized the material of the waistcoats as a very distinctive fur called astrakhan. While astrakhan waistcoats were unknown to me, astrakhan was very fashionable in the…

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